Bahama Bob's Rumstyles

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

A Refreshing Swizzle for a Hot Summer Day

There is nothing more refreshing on a hot afternoon than a really good Swizzle.  Watermelon is in season right now and really ripe and juice melons are in the market.   I enjoy watermelon and find it to be a really good ingredient for summer cocktails.   Here is a twist on the whole swizzle idea that comes out of Bermuda.

Bahana Bob’s Melon Barrel Swizzle
  • 1 ½ Oz.  Mount Gay Black Barrel Rum
  • ¾ Oz. Agave Nectar
  • Juice of ½ Lime
  • ¼ Oz.  St. Germaine Liqueur
  • 4 Cubes of Seedless Watermelon
  • 2 Dashes Bitters
  • 1 Pinch Sea Salt

Place all ingredients in a blender filled with a cup  and a half of ice and quick on and off three or four times. Pour into a Collins glass and garnish with a watermelon wedge.


Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Living the "Jimmy Buffett" Lifestyle


   A lot of people come down to the Keys in search of the "Jimmy Buffett" lifestyle.  Key West and for that matter the entire Florida Keys are a perfect fit.   The warm weather link with the warm ocean and gulf waters that surround the them, the Keys are ideal for living in this wonderful fantasy.

     A combination of total acceptance of many different lifestyles, the availability of party venues plus a great selection for fun an unique cocktails and spirits.   These are the ingredients that make for a perfect paradise.   There have been many songwriters, poets, writers and other celebrities that have called the Keys home over the years, one of the reasons is the laid back atmosphere that allows them the anonymity to be real everyday people for the most part themselves.

     I'm in my eleventh year here and you couldn't pry me out of here with a crowbar.  All of the
elements that allow me to work, play and be creative makes this place my true "Garden of Eden".   I really believe that the salt air and waters get into your blood and leaves you with a new and wonderful outlook on life.  It is easier to accept things and enjoying the ways of other people as well.

     These keys are a lot more that just a place that has more bars, restaurants, and tourist per acre than almost any other place on earth, but more importantly it has an aura of life and understanding.  Everyone here has a different reason for being here, but most all of them can find a huge group of wonderful people that love to get together to share their fun with.

Monday, June 27, 2016

When is "Rum Not Rum"?

     An article in Liquor .Com that really bothered me.   It claims that there is a distillery in Colorado asking if you would you drink "rum" made from beets? Not from sugar cane. Not from molasses. Beets. Now you can. "Stoneyard Colorado Rum" is billed as the state’s first “farm to flask” rum."
They built their still from pieces from the old Florida Hostess Cake Company plant and is producing "Rum" from sugar beets.  Read More at http://www.liquor.com/articles/stoneyard-beet-rum/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=6.24+Unusual+Rum-ab&utm_term=Liquor%3A+Total+%28Consumer%29#gs._5gvNKQ   "

     What really bothers me is the fact that people don't understand that "Rum" only has one basic rule, it must be produced from a direct derivative of the sugarcane.  That means sugarcane itself, molasses or a blend of products made from sugar cane.   Beet Sugar is no more cane syrup than is high fruitose corn syrup.  There are sugars that come from most any plant, but when you make alcohol from them they are not all "rum".   Corn sugars make bourbon; rye makes whiskey; potatoes and other sugars combined make vodka and grapes make wine.   We don't call any of these "rum", even if beet sugar spirits are aged in bourbon barrels, they are a spirit with no name.

     The raw materials are what give rum its flavor and it will not be the same if it is made with anything other than sugarcane.  Richard Seale of Foursquare Distillery in Barbados makes it perfectly clear.   "The raw material is what makes the wine (or beer) and gives the wine/beer its flavor and the distilled spirit must retain the character of the wine (or beer) to have an identity (no flavor = alcohol aka vodka). Distilling wine made from sugar cane is what makes it rum. It is the flavor that decided it. Distilling beer from cereal is what makes it whisky. Again it is the flavor that decides it and the flavor is derived from the raw material."

       Let's keep "Rum" clearly "Rum" and not a hybrid or something that because it is made from some other variety of table sugar we can call it "Rum".  This also applies to those companies that are using neutral spirits from other materials blended with the cane distillate and calling it "Rum".

Sunday, June 26, 2016

The Old Man of the Clouds

    The other evening there was a very unique sighting in front of me as I watched the skies paint their evening colors and images.  Out of a wind swept thunderhead, appeared an old man with the sun in his face abd the wind whipping his hair behind him.  What was really cool was that he hung around for 15 or 20 minutes.


Saturday, June 25, 2016

Demerara Distilling Ltd. Reveals their El Dorado 50 Year Old Special Reserve Rum

     Demerara Distillers Limited on Monday unveiled its El Dorado Grand Special Reserve, a 50-year-old rum with an 18 carat premium Guyanese gold medallion.  This special edition is in honor of Guyana’s 50th Independence Anniversary. This edition, fondly called “Liquid Gold”, is not only special, but is limited; there are only 600 bottles up for sale.   “I believe this is the best bottle of rum money can buy anywhere on planet earth,” Samaroo further posited.



President Granger, in applauding Demerara Distillers Limited on maintaining a rich historical legacy within the rum industry, not only locally but internationally, said: “Guyana’s Rum Industry thrives because it is committed to high standards and quality assurance; it has devoted the time, the energy, and resources necessary to developing a strong brand.”

     Four casks were signed by President David Granger, the three containing El Dorado 50 Year Old Special Reserve Rum, will be placed into storage for another 25 years, the other cask will be filled with mementos.   These casks will be opened when Guyana celebrates its Diamond Jubilee, in the next 25 years.
     Before handing over the first bottle of the limited edition rum, Samaroo explained that “each bottle of the 50th Anniversary Rum has an 18 carat gold pendant with an El Dorado Logo specially crafted by a Guyanese jeweler.”   He further explained that each of the 600 specially crafted bottles of rum was certified by the Master Blender, Sharon Sue-Hang.   “The selling price is $500,000 per bottle plus Sales Tax,” he posited.

He noted that $100,000 from each bottle sold will be donated to the Demerara Distilling Ltd. Foundation to assist young, bright but unfortunate Guyanese in acquiring a high standard of education.
Port Mourant Still,

     Two-thirds of the blend of the Special Edition comes from barrels of rum that were distilled on the transferred still, known as the Port Mourant Still, and laid down to preserve in 1966.   The 1966 batch was then augmented with rums that are 40 to almost 50-years-old.   The Port Mourant Still comprises two large wooden vats constructed from Greenheart. It was first erected in 1732 at Port Mourant.

Friday, June 24, 2016

Watermelon Pina Splash

Summer means that there are a lot of fresh fruits and melons that have ripened and make for great refreshing cocktails.  Here is an idea that will spark you palate and keep you smiling for hours.  Watermelon is a great cocktail base when mixed with other great ingredients.  This one really works thanks to the help of Plantation Pineapple Rum.



Watermelon Pina Splash

  • 2 oz. Planation Pineapple Rum
  • ½ cup Fresh Watermelon Piecess
  • Juice of Half a Lime
  • ¾ oz. Cane Syrup


Combine lime juice cane syrup and watermelon in a mixing glass and muddle lightly, add Plantation Pineapple Rum with ice and vigorously until chilled.   Pour into a tumbler, garnish with a watermelon slice.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Bacardi Visitors Centre Offering Oak Barrel Sunglasses

     Bacardi is endeavoring to be as green as possible in it operations.  In this light they have come out with sunglasses that are made from oak rum barrels that have run their course as aging barrels.  The barrels are disassembled and the staves are cut into the pieces for the sunglasses.   BACARDÍ at the rum factory outside San Juan, Puerto Rico, they chip up some old barrels for mulch or reused for planters an chairs among other uses. Today they are transforming them  by hand into artisan-crafted eye wear so customers can both drink and wear BACARDÍ.
     “With sights set on seeing a net-zero impact, the Company’s eco-friendly, reclaimed-wood eyewear innovations metaphorically promote our eco-focus and allow clients to take a new, ‘greener’ view with wearable, sustainable art that actually protects their eyes,” says Maggie Matias, managing director for the Bacardi Visitor Centre, who is based at the world’s largest premium rum distillery.   Certified craftsmen make the eye wear manually in a time consuming process of assembling, sanding and finishing the frames producing these unique wood framed sunglasses.   There are four exclusive and stylish lines of sunglasses, each pair features a carved BACARDÍ bat logo at the temple as well as Italian polarized lenses.   The wooden-framed BACARDÍ eye wear hits the mark with several designs that highlight the wood grain and texture.    Details like sharp lines, soft curves and green materials make the line of sunglasses universal for all.    The lenses come in cobalt blue or sunrise orange, while the frames, each unique, come in blond wood and dark chestnut hues.   The sunglasses will retail for US$195 each, are light and comfortable to wear and are only sold at the Casa BACARDÍ Visitor Centre Store in Cataño, Puerto Rico.
“At Bacardi, our challenge is to think in new, creative ways to help the environment and our consumers. This is just one example of how we recycle materials to give them new life and ensure that nothing goes to waste, and this is part of our long-term view for the future,” adds Eduardo Vallado Moreno, vice president for Supply Chain and Manufacturing for Bacardi in the Americas, whose responsibility includes the Puerto Rico facility.